American Idol Top-10 Finalist and KRK User Dennis Lorenzo Offers Insight on Influence, and Becoming Your Own Artist

Dennis Lorenzo KRK ROKIT Blog 2 1American Idol Top-10 finalist Dennis Lorenzo offers insight on influence and a list of artists who helped sculpt him into a diverse music creator.

“So, what kind of music do you make?” This is a question people ask me all the time, and let me tell you, it used to be a difficult one for me to answer. Part of the reason is because I grew up listening to so many different genres of music, and I really was influenced by everyone one of them. There were two genres however that stood out from my childhood, and would later define me as a musician. I’m talking about Rock and Soul music.

Dennis Lorenzo KRK ROKIT G4 1ROCK

When I go back as far as I can remember, I have memories of my Mom playing, “Frontline” by Stevie Wonder, “Beat It”, by Michael Jackson and every song in Prince’s catalog. All of this music had one thing in common, Rock “n” Roll. I didn’t really think too much of it until I became somewhat obsessed with the music in WWF promos, which was 99.9% rock music. One Christmas I asked my Mom for 4 albums, the artists were Three Days Grace, The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus, 30 Seconds To Mars, and Breaking Benjamin. I studied them all, and then some. I think one of the most defining moments for me happened at the final scene of my favorite film of all time, “The Matrix”. Neo says his closing line and then boom, “Wake Up” by Rage Against The Machine plays, that was when I knew I was a rocker at heart.

SOUL

Musiq SoulchildOn the other side of the spectrum, which I happen to be most known for, we also listened to the likes of Donny Hathaway, Jill Scott, Boyz II Men, The Temptations, and Whitney Houston among many other great soul artists of my time and before. Actually, the first time my Mom found out I could “really sing” (as she puts it), was when I sang the high note at the end of “Love” by Music Soulchild in the backseat of her car when I was 10—and I didn’t think she was listening. Soul and RnB music was surely the default in my household growing up.

When I was 15, I’d ask my Grandma and Pop-pop to buy me a guitar, that gift changed my life forever. I taught myself how to play guitar at 17, and I haven’t looked back since. While my voice grew more soulful, you would find that rock had influenced most of the music I was writing. I listened to Jeff Buckley, Hendrix, Andre 3000, Circa Survive, Coheed and Cambria, and Donny Hathaway always, that pretty much sums up what my music was like back then.

ATLANTA

Pushing ahead a few years to my time in Atlanta, you’d have found me with a laptop and a keyboard as much as you’d see me with my guitar. Compared to Philly, this was a completely different world for me. Picture this, I moved to Atlanta in 2013, we’re talking Dennis Lorenzo KRK ROKIT G4 7 2Future, Migos, Mike Will Made It, Rae Sremmurd, Rich Homie Quan, Young Thug, I mean the list goes on. Trap wasn’t just a genre of music in Atlanta, it was a lifestyle. I’ll never forget the first time I heard the “S**t” by Future. I was like “What the hell is this?” It was different from NY, Philly or Jersey’s style of Hip Hop, there were no boundaries, and the 808’s were booming! The song “Versace” by Migos and Drake pretty much shaped a new sound for hip hop, along with artists like Lil Wayne. And the Migos are from ATL. It’s almost like Atlanta trap became the new Pop music. I was immersed in the culture. So much that I taught myself how produce trap music! It became my favorite thing of all time. A common joke among my brothers and I was how they’d hear/see me late at night, breathing heavily, slamming keyboard keys, and being blinded by my MacBook light, with my headphones blaring (I’m laughing as I write this thinking back). By the end of 2015 however, I came to a realization that I didn’t want to fully accept: my time in Atlanta had reached its peak, I had to make a move that would take me to the next of my artistry, and not just as a producer, so I moved to LA.

IN MY BLOOD

DLAbout 2 and half years after I moved to LA, I got my first “big break” on American Idol. The most important part of that journey was when I sang “In My Blood” by Shawn Mendes. When I finished, Lionel Richie brought himself to his feet and said to me “I just want to congratulate you because there is a time in every performer’s life, when you actually break through the ceiling, and you’re introduced to your new self. You have just taken that next step my friend. I am very proud of you!” After that Katy Perry said that I’m “Alternative” and that I remind her of Chris Cornell, another one of my biggest influences.

After my stint on the show ended, I went on a short hiatus and began to really craft my sound which is now a blend of Rock, Soul and Trap. I believe that the sky’s the limit for any artist who really knows himself/herself. Finding your sound, and/or where you fit in is no small feat for artists these days, especially in an industry that demands more and more of what it already has. It takes courage, strength, practice, trial & error, and failure to find who you are in this business.

It also takes these things to win, because that’s what you do when you find yourself regardless of where you end up.

MORE INFORMATION:

IG: @dennislorenzo

FB: @Hllywdrenz

TW:  @DennisLorenzo

Dennis Lorenzo uses KRK ROKIT G4 RP7 Monitors

How to Build Affordable, Professional Looking Acoustic Sound Treatment Panels – Part 1

Building Acoustic Treatment Wall Panels

KRK DIY acoustic panels finalJimmy from KRK here, and I wanted to share my experience of building my own sound panels for a home studio.  I built wall panels, corner traps, and an overhead-cloud which will be shared on three separate articles—this article is strictly about building wall panels.  KRK pioneered the home recording revolution and it is no secret that many recent hit songs have been either partially or completely recorded and mixed in a home or project studio.  Whether you are in a basement, a bedroom, or a living room, acoustic treatment will go a long way for your final production results.  Many overlook the importance of sound treatment after spending a lot of money on high-end recording gear.  Quality recording gear such as a pair of KRK Monitors is certainly important, but it is also important to keep in mind that good gear magnifies the sonic environment for better or for worse.  Sound treatment panels help shape these scenarios for more professional results.

Acoustic treatment wall panels are very important for a few reasons:

  1. They absorb the first sound reflections from the speakers so that the frequency waves are dampened and tamed.
  2. In general, they absorb the sound in the room to control echo and reverberation. For modern music creators this is essential because many people track vocals and instruments in the same room as the mix position.

20200427_172238_HDRFor truly professional results, it is essential to have a controlled environment for tracking, mixing and mastering.  For those on a budget and space-constraints, it is difficult to create a perfect listening environment unless you are building a room from scratch (floating room, sound proofing inside the walls, etc.,) but it is possible to greatly improve your surroundings for successful professional results.  A smart way to look at it is to figure out what it is you are trying to accomplish before you purchase or build anything.  Some of the important questions to ask are:

  • How much can I afford to put into the project?
    • (I wanted to keep my costs as low as possible.)
  • Is it important for the place to look professional?
    • (I wanted to room to look as professional as possible.)
  • Will a room with a “vibe” make you or whoever is using the room feel more creative?
    • (I wanted a great vibe to the room.)
  • What are the basic sonic elements and trouble-spots in the room?
    • (I have an uneven 13.5-foot x 11-foot room with low ceilings which creates a lot of bass problems.)
  • Will the room be used for mixing, recording, mastering, or for everything?
    • (I will be using the room for mixing, recording (including vocals and acoustic instruments), and some mastering depending on the project.)
  • What genre of music will the room be used for (i.e. Hip-hop with a lot of low end, Jazz, Rock, EDM, etc.)
    • (I will be using this room for many genres of music.)

In this article, by taking all those questions into consideration, I came up with a game plan to build my own acoustic treatment for the room.

Before I go into any detail, I would like to mention that I am not a professional carpenter, and these are not direct instructions on “how to” build acoustic panels.  In this article I show how I built my sound panels—and if you attempt to build your own you are responsible for how you use this information to build and install them on your own, and at your own risk.  You are responsible for how you use this information.  I am also not claiming in any way to be an expert on this matter.  I simply did some research, talked to a lot of trusted friends, used my past studio experience, and then built the panels in my own way.  Also, I used some basic power tools and hand tools that I will recommend, so if you are uncomfortable using tools please seek help from a professional – thanks!

(Click on any of the images below for a larger image.)

KRK DIY ACOUSTIC PANELSFor my room I measured the walls and decided that I would place eight (8) 4-foot x 2-foot x 4-inch panels strategically hanging around the perimeter.  From research and talking to those who have built panels, I decided that these panels would not go flush against the wall but rather would sit 1.5-inches away from the wall.  This creates an air gap that allows the panel to absorb sound from both sides which in turn creates greater sound absorption.  Later in this article I will explain how I accomplished this feature.

After pricing out the insulation, I decided to go with a mix of Owens Corning 703 (I actually used Knauf which is the same specs just more organic) and Rockwool sheets both being 4-foot x 2-foot x 4-inch (I had to double up the Knauf as it came in 2-inch thick sheets.)  From what I understand they are very similar in nature but the Knauf and OC703 are more expensive.

Here are estimated costs for building one panel:

  • Roxul 4-inch thick Mineral Wool 4-foot x 2-foot sheet, Cost:  $14.50
  • (2)  8-foot x 3-inch x ¾-inch Furring strips (wood) from Home Depot, Cost:  $2.75 (for the exterior frame)
  • (2)  6-foot x 4-inch x ¾-inch Pine, Cost: $11.13 (for the box-frame)
  • Fabric – CASTIELLE ACOUSTIC SUEDE FABRIC BY THE YARD, Cost: $6.50 (1 panel)
  • Wrapping for back of panel- Home Depot paper-throw tarp, Cost: $1:75 (1 panel)
  • Screws for assembling the box and frame, Cost:  $.72
  • Screws for mounting the panels to the wall, Cost: $.10
  • 3/8 Staples, Cost:  $.35
  • Polyurethane/Stain, Cost:  $.95

Tools Used:

  • Sandpaper (I used a motorized sander which was easier)
  • Electric Power Miter Saw (you can very easily achieve the same cuts with a hand saw)
  • Pro grade staple gun (not electric)
  • Staples (“T50 3/8th” 10mm Heavy Duty made by Arrow)
  • All-in-one polyurethane/stain and a brush
  • Stud-finder
  • Philips head screwdriver (I used a power driver, but a regular screwdriver will work fine)
  • Knee pads
  • Protective rubber work gloves, eye protection, and a breathing mask

BUILD THE BOX-FRAME – MEASURE AND CUT THE WOOD:  There are basically two components to the frame on these: The box-frame that houses the insulation, and the external frame that goes over the box to make it look nice.  For the box-frame, I first took each 6-foot board and cut them down so that there were two (2) 4-foot pieces, and two (2) 2-foot pieces.

KRK DIY Acoustic-Panels-sandingSAND THE EDGES: Using a power sander (you can easily accomplish the same task with sandpaper) I sanded down all the edges of each piece and made sure there were no splintering ends popping up.  So now I had 4 sanded pieces of wood to work with.

 

KRK DIY screw-frame-box-1BUILD THE FRAME BY SCREWING TOGETHER THE PIECES:  This can get a bit tricky if you are working alone.  Joining the first 2 pieces of wood are the hardest.  The ends of a long piece and a short piece are joined with the short piece on top.  Using a table as a sawhorse to stabilize the pieces since I am workingKRK DIY screw-frame-box-21 alone, I lined up the pieces and drove the first screw in so that it went through the top end of the short piece into the end edge of the long piece.  I drove the screw in very slowly and carefully to minimize the chance of splitting the wood.  The second screw was then driven into the other end of the corner. KRK DIY Acoustic-panels-finished-frame-boxOnce the two screws were in, I then worked my way around the perimeter of the frame until the box was built.  The most important thing to remember here is to make sure the screws are put in straight, and to try to drive the screws down the middle of the long pieces.

BUILD THE EXTERIOR FRAME – MEASURE AND CUT THE WOOD (FURRING STRIPS):  The exterior frame is what makes these panels look professional.  To accomplish this, KRK DIY acoustic-panels-attach-frames-2first I exactly measured the inside perimeter of the box-frame so that I knew how to cut the exterior frame.  The exterior frame goes over the box-frame, so it overlaps—meaning that the inside perimeter of the exterior frame is smaller than the inside perimeter of the box-frame.  This helps to keep the insulation in place and makes it easier to staple in the fabric – it also covers up the box-frame.  So, with my inside perimeter of the box-frame being 48-inches x 22.5-inches, I measured out the furring strips and made my 45 degree angle cuts so that the inside perimeter of the furring strips were 46.5-inches x 21-inches.  This created an overlapping boarder over the box-frame to keep in the insulation and fabric.

SAND THE EDGES:  I then sanded the edges of the furring strips with a power sander so that there were no rough edges to be found.

KRK DIY Acoustic-panels-staple-exterior-frameASSEMBLE THE EXTERIOR FRAME:  I inspected the wood and identified the best sides.  These furring strips are so cheap that you must check out each piece to make sure they are visually suitable, and usually one side is better than the other.  Next, I laid out all 4 pieces on the ground upside down so that the staples that join the pieces are not on the visible side.  Starting in one corner, I then began to staple the pieces together until the frame was one rectangular piece.

KRK DIY acoustic-panels-attach-frames-3ATTACH THE EXTERIOR FRAME TO THE BOX-FRAME:  The biggest thing to remember here is that the exterior frame is not very stable until it is screwed into the box-frame.  So, knowing this I carefully lifted the exterior frame in one motion, flipped it over and placed it on top of the box frame.  Starting at one of the 2-foot ends, I visually lined up the frame so that it was evenly placed on the box-frame.   This is not too important because you can manipulate how it sits as you start to screw it down.  I then took a screw (the same screws as the other step) and in one corner, carefully screwed through the top of the exterior frame into the edge of the box-frame.

KRK DIY acoustic-panels-attach-frames-5This can be tricky as you must make sure you are aligning the screw correctly so that it hits the middle of the box-frame edge.  The best way to do this is to move to the opposite corner and then align and drive another screw.   Continue onto the other end and manipulate the exterior frame so that it lines up straight.   Once you have 4 screws in the corners and the exterior frame is straight and aligned properly over the box-frame, continue to drive 4 more screws into the opposite edges and then more screws in the middle of the frame for stability.

KRK DIY PANELS STAINSTAIN AND POLYURETHANE THE FRAME:  After the frame was assembled, I used an all-in-one polyurethane/stain to finish the panel.  You can also paint the frame, but either way make sure that you allow it to dry so that you do not ruin the fabric when you go to the next step.

 

KRK DIY ACOUSTIC PANELS STAPLESTAPLE IN THE FABRIC:  After the frame dried, I turned it upside down and stapled in the fabric.  It is important to note that the fabric is being stapled to the underneath-overlay of the exterior frame.  The best way to do this is to start in one corner and work your way down the long side laying in staples about every 5 inches or so.   The corners are the most KRK DIY Acoustic-Panels-Frame-overlayimportant thing to consider.  Next lay in staples on a short side and continue along the other long side.  You need to get a feel for it, but you want to gently pull the fabric as tight as possible without ripping it out from the other side.   You want to pull the fabric toward you and away from each last staple you laid in.  Leaving one short side un-stapled, I then went back between the 5-inch staples on each long side and laid in more staples pulling the fabric tighter.  Finally, I went to the last short side and laid in staples to pull the fabric as tight as possible.  It is helpful at this point to double check the corners to make sure they are covered and tight.KRK DIY ACOUSTIC PANELS FABRIC

LAY IN THE INSULATION:  Wearing protective gloves, KRK DIY Acoustic-Panels-insulationa long sleeve shirt and a low-grade breathing mask, I handled the insulation carefully and laid it into the upside-down frame.  I then stapled the insulation to the box-frame around the perimeter, but did not go overboard on this step.

 

KRK DIY ACOUSTIC PANELS WRAPWRAP AND STAPLE THE BACK OF THE PANEL WITH PAPER/POLY DROP CLOTH OR WRAP COMPLETELY IN FABRIC:  As I stated before, I was going for a “cost-effective” approach here with my whole room.  One of the ways I saved money was by covering the back of the panels with the above noted cloth, opposed to wrapping each panel completely in the acoustic KRK DIY Acoustic-panels-wrap-backfabric.   I think wrapping the insulation completely in fabric is much easier and probably a much better all-around solution, but in my case, I was trying to save some money.  I achieved this by just sealing the back off with the cloth and staples.  I went around the perimeter of the frame over the insulation, and then I folded the cloth back over so that it was double wrapped.

 

INSTALLING THE PANELS TO THE WALLS:  After many considerations, I came up with a unique and inexpensive way to get these panels up on the walls using 4 short screws and 1 long screw—this created that air-gap which creates even better sound absorption.  Since the wood I used was so inexpensive, it was also very light which helped with the installation.

KRK DIY ACOUSTIC PANELS BACKUsing the same screws to assemble the frames, I drove in a screw in the back of each corner so that there was 1.5-inches from the head of the screw to the frame.  Once hung, this created the “air-gap” between the panel and the wall that I was talking about earlier in this article.

Next, I found the first points of reflection on each wall and determined where to place the first two (left-wall and right-wall) panels (search: “acoustic panel mirror trick” for help with placement).  Once I determined this, I then used a stud-finder to see if I could utilize a wall-stud to drive the holding screw in.  On one wall I got lucky and on another I was forced to use a heavy-duty wall anchor.

KRK DIY PANELS WALL SCREWOn the wall, I made a mark roughly where the speaker cone hits and then I made two more marks roughly where the top and bottom of the panel would be centered vertically considering the cone height.  Referencing by eye, I then drove a long 6-inch screw into the wall so that roughly 3-inches were exposed.  I then simply hung the panel on that screw and the 1.5-inch screws rest against the wall to create the gap.  In my case, nothing brushes up against these panels, but you may want to come up with a more secure installation method if there will be a lot of activity around the panels.

KRK DIY acoustic-wall-panels-installation-3The result is 8 professional-looking custom panels floating off the walls.  The difference in the sound control of the room is astonishing and the look is very professional.  The clarity and control I now have from my productions are accurate and inspirational, especially knowing that what I am hearing will translate correctly though other listening environments and devices.KRK DIY acoustic panels final 2

Next month I will focus on Part 2–corner trap panels.  Thanks for taking the time to read this and please post questions and comments below.

Advice from American Idol Top-10 Finalist and KRK User Dennis Lorenzo on Being a Modern Music Creator

KRK ROKIT G4 user Dennis Lorenzo is an inspiring and accomplished modern singer/songwriter/musician whose story is unlike most.  Growing up in PA, he turned some adverse situations into positive outcomes through optimism and music, eventually landing himself on American Idol as a Season 16 Top-10 contender.  We are fortunate to have Dennis as a “KRK Blog-takeover Artist” who has shared his American Idol story with us through his eyes:

Dennis Lorenzo
#LiveLoveLorenzo

Dennis Lorenzo KRK ROKIT G4 5a

Being a modern music creator these days is dynamic!  Not only am I constantly songwriting, producing and mixing at home, I also have to keep up digitally with my fans—which at times can be the perfect outlet for any artist.  In my case, it’s dope to be able to engage with people online since most of my fans aren’t able to make it to my shows.  It also gives me the opportunity to learn about people all around the world!  What’s even cooler is the story about how I gained my fans.  I’m one of the lucky ones who got through to the American Idol platform, and I figured it would be interesting to share my story on how I got there.

It all started with a phone call from a friend when my business partner and I were about a week into working on another artist’s project.  This day had been “personally challenging” for me as I was craving to start work on my own music after grinding day in and day out on someone else’s.  To get a break, I stepped outside the studio lobby to about 77 degrees of that good ol’ LA weather, which was the opposite of the humidity I’d faced in Philly.  The studio owner was outside and before he headed back in he gave me a nod and a “What up D?  – Y’all in there workin!” I’ll never forget laying down on a bench between two lion statues outside this studio, looking to the sky for 15 minutes and wondering, “man, what’s next?”  I had been grinding, working hard and doing everything right, but I wasn’t sure how I was going to get to the next chapter—the next level.

Dennis Lorenzo KRK ROKIT G4 9Getting back into the studio, I sat down to listen to what they’d recorded and as soon as my bro Aaron pressed play, my phone began to vibrate.  I excused myself once more to take the call and it was my friend Ranae, her tone was excited but serious.  She got straight to the point, “Hey Dennis, so this is urgent! I have a friend who is a producer at American Idol and he’s looking for talent. He asked me if I knew anyone and I immediately thought of you! This is no joke—super serious!” Before I could spit out my response, she said, “If you’re down, please send me a video of you singing and playing guitar, ASAP!” Of course, I said, “Well hell yeah I’m down—I’ll send it right over!” To that she responded, “I’m so excited for you! I’ll forward it to him when I get it, and he’ll call you today or tomorrow, so glue your phone to your hand or something!” He called me that same day and well, the rest is history…

American Idol backstage KRKLater that week I found myself standing in line with thousands of other musicians, each of us about to take on the opportunity of a lifetime.  I stood in front of Lionel Richie, Katy Perry and Luke Bryan.  I grew up listening to a lot of rock and artists like Lionel, and not many people knew how big of a KP fan I was.  Sometime after I had first moved to LA, I went to Runyon Canyon.  Me and my bro Will overheard a tour guide from the bus yelling “And THIS is Katy Perry’s house!”  That was a big deal because again, I loved Katy Perry.  I said to myself “One day, I’m gonna meet her out here.”  What were the odds that the American Idol show would be revived, I’d get a call to audition, and that KP would be one of the judges? – good enough apparently!

DLSo there I stood, in front of three juggernauts of their respective genres. Teamed up with my broken guitar with a hole in it, I sang “Unaware” by Allen Stone, another big influence of mine. That performance got me a golden ticket and etched a new chapter in my music career. The experience was like being inserted into the thick of the music industry overnight. There were very late nights, really early mornings, euphoria, stress, and butterflies in your stomach all at once.  It was awesome!  I made it to Top 10 on the show, which was incredible to say the least.

Dennis Lorenzo KRK ROKIT G4 1A lot of people ask what my overall take away from the experience was or what did I learn, and here is what I normally say.  Firstly, if you think your career is set for life after becoming Top-10 on a show like American Idol, think again!  That’s when the real work begins:

  • Be sure to maintain/cater to the fan-base you’ve acquired and stay on top of your Social Media.
  • Create something EVERY SINGLE DAY, even if you write one song, sing and create every day.
  • Play as many shows as you can (If you have management, they’ll get you to where you need to be).
  • Some may challenge this, but don’t veer to far away from your style on the show; be who you are. Don’t be afraid to try new things, or take chances, but remember, you don’t want to experiment too much during your “opportunity of a lifetime.”  So take your chances, but don’t make every performance something different,—trust me, I know from experience.
  • This last one is very important, and it actually applies to every facet of life, remember to live in the moment.  Don’t let thoughts of winning or losing consume you.  I say this because I’ve seen it happen.  And remember this, do anything you do in moderation. So, it’s totally fine to acknowledge the fact that you will technically either win or lose, however, the moment you allow your psyche to become riddled with those thoughts, you’ve lost yourself.  There is no way to maintain your truth or yourself while those things are ruling you.  Because the truth is, the moment you get that golden ticket, you can take that win ANYWHERE.

Dennis Lorenzo KRK ROKIT G4 2There’s also one final thing I want to share with you! If you’re an artist and you’re reading this because you’re a fan of mine, or because you just want to read what some guy who almost won American Idol has to say, get a home studio setup! To those who already have one, and I know there are many, you’d be surprised how many artists don’t take that leap. So, here’s what you’ll actually need:

  • A computer (laptop or desktop/Mac or PC—it does not really matter anymore).
  • DAW (Digital Audio Workstation—there are some great free ones available now).
  • A microphone – you would be surprised how great some mics under $100 sound these days.
  • A pair of decent studio speakers – I use the KRK ROKIT G4 as they adapt to my home sound-environment with the KRK Audio Tools app.
  • A keyboard/midi controller – (not a necessity, but I highly recommend one for creating music.)
  • Mic stand.
  • Interface – this is the unit (box) that plugs into your computer and goes between your mic, guitar, keyboard, bass, etc. Again, there are some decent low-cost choices out there these days.
  • A comfortable studio chair (these are in NO way overrated 😉 ).

Dennis Lorenzo KRK ROKIT G4 8Here’s a list of what I use: MacBook Pro, Logic and Ableton Live, Apogee Hype Mic, a pair of KRK Rokit 7 G4s  (these are really great speakers for a home studio!), Yamaha Portable Grand, Stage Stands mic stand, Audeze LCD-1 headphones, KRK KNS800 Headphones (for mix reference), Apogee Duet, and some random studio chair I found a few blocks from my house.

Dennis Lorenzo KRK ROKIT G4 6One final, final thing to note: I know how this business can be, so getting help as you navigate through is a must. With that, I hope this article was of some help to you, until next time, rock on!

MusicRadar names KRK ROKIT G4 the #1 Best Studio Monitor Speaker in the World Today

Music Radar ROKIT #1We created the ROKIT G4 (Generation 4) monitors specifically for modern music creators.  They were meticulously re-engineered to work in any environment from professional studios, to home studios, to hotel rooms, dorm rooms, and everywhere in between.  We partnered with some of the most trusted industry ears and put them up against every single monitor on the market in their price class.  We went back to the drawing board many times until we were satisfied that our customers would have the best music creation tool possible.

We are thankful that our work on the ROKIT G4 series has been recognized by these great industry resources:

 

music-radarMUSIC RADAR

ROKIT G4 – 7″ (#1 Best Studio Monitor Speaker in the World Today):

https://www.musicradar.com/news/the-best-studio-monitor-speakers-in-the-world-today

“For starters, the G4 range is among the first monitor series at this price bracket to include a graphic EQ function on the speaker itself. In-built digital signal processing (DSP) offers a suite of tools, including a room analyser, to ensure the speakers’ output compensates the space you’re mixing in for any dead-zones or sonic blind spots you may be unwittingly harbouring.”

MUSIC REPO 2MUSIC REPO

https://www.musicrepo.com/best-studio-monitors/

“ROKIT G4 are well reviewed, and probably the most recommended monitors at this price point – with the new features that place them well ahead of their rivals.”

Consordini-logoCONSORDINI

ROKIT G4 – 5”   (#1 All-around Best Budget Monitor)

https://consordini.com/best-budget-studio-monitors-under-200/#krk-rokit-5-g4

“ROKIT G4 sound amazing and we would recommend them to producers of any skill level, whether you are an entry-level producer or a pro.”

 

 

More great reviews:

Performer 2PERFORMER MAGAZINE:  https://bit.ly/2JEquo5

“The other big addition to the new line, and the reason the slight bump in price is worth it, is the addition of brand new DSP and a new rear-mounted screen that allows you to tune the monitors to your room, adjust EQ curves and eliminate problems with acoustics based upon your space.

Overall, the new ROKIT G4s will likely become the new standard in home studio setups, so don’t be surprised if your Insta-feed is soon flooded with yellow speakers and unboxing videos.”

recordingRECORDING MAGAZINE:  https://bit.ly/347yNSJ

“The ROKIT 5 G4 is a fantastic improvement on the well-respected ROKIT theme in every way, and proof that great-sounding small monitors do not have to break the bank.”

 

mixMIX MAGAZINE:  https://www.mixonline.com/technology/krk-rokit-g4-monitors

“Accurate and consistent sound quality; good value for the money; DSP-based EQ offers plenty of room-tuning options; tight-sounding bass; Rokit 5 G4 offers good bass response for its size; Encoder/LCD interface allows for precise L/R matching; acoustic pads on bottom help with decoupling.”

 

sosSOUND ON SOUND:  https://www.soundonsound.com/reviews/krk-rokit-7-g4

“These speakers come across as detailed but smooth-sounding with clean mids and a bass end that is tighter than you might expect from a small ported speaker.”

 

 

READ MORE INFORMATION ON ROKIT G4